Another Way to Reverse Diabetes

Here’s another way to reverse Type 2 Diabetes (E. L. Lim, K. G. Hollingsworth, B. S. Aribisala, M. J. Chen, J. C. Mathers, R. Taylor. Reversal of type 2 diabetes: normalisation of beta cell function in association with decreased pancreas and liver triacylglycerol. Diabetologia, October 2011, Volume 54, Issue 10, pp 2506–2514). Here were the subjects:

Eleven people with type 2 diabetes (49.5 ± 2.5 years, BMI 33.6 ± 1.2 kg/m2, nine male and two female) were studied before and after 1, 4 and 8 weeks of a 2.5 MJ (600 kcal)/day diet.

Here are the results:

After 1 week of restricted energy intake, fasting plasma glucose normalised in the diabetic group (from 9.2 ± 0.4 to 5.9 ± 0.4 mmol/l; p = 0.003).

Insulin suppression of hepatic glucose output improved from 43 ± 4% to 74 ± 5% (p = 0.003 vs baseline; controls 68 ± 5%).

Hepatic triacylglycerol content fell from 12.8 ± 2.4% in the diabetic group to 2.9 ± 0.2% by week 8 (p = 0.003).

The first-phase insulin response increased during the study period (0.19 ± 0.02 to 0.46 ± 0.07 nmol min−1 m−2p < 0.001) and approached control values (0.62 ± 0.15 nmol min−1 m−2p = 0.42).

Maximal insulin response became supranormal at 8 weeks (1.37 ± 0.27 vs controls 1.15 ± 0.18 nmol min−1 m−2).

Pancreatic triacylglycerol decreased from 8.0 ± 1.6% to 6.2 ± 1.1% (p = 0.03).

Other interesting factoids from the study. In Type 2 diabetics:

Beta cell function declines linearly with time, and after 10 years more than 50% of individuals require insulin therapy.

Here’s the data from the study.

VariableControlsBaselineWeek 1Week 4Week 8
Weight (kg)101.5 ± 3.4103.7 ± 4.599.7 ± 4.5*94.1 ± 4.3 *88.4 ± 4.3*†
BMI (kg/m2)33.4 ± 0.933.6 ± 1.232.3 ± 1.2*30.5 ± 1.2*28.7 ± 1.3*†
Fat mass (kg)36.2 ± 2.739.0 ± 3.536.6 ± 3.6 *31.7 ± 3.7 *26.3 ± 4.0*
ffm (kg)64.7 ± 3.864.7 ± 3.063.2 ± 3.162.4 ± 3.0 *62.1 ± 3.0*
Waist circumference (cm)105.0 ± 1.5107.4 ± 2.2104.4 ± 2.2*99.7 ± 2.4 *94.2 ± 2.5*†
Hip circumference (cm)109.8 ± 2.4109.5 ± 2.9108.3 ± 2.7*105.0 ± 2.6*99.5 ± 2.6*†
WHR0.96 ± 0.020.98 ± 0.020.97 ± 0.020.95 ± 0.010.95 ± 0.01

It is remarkable that the people lost mostly fat. The Fat Free Mass loss was only 2.6kg (about 6 lbs). The fat loss was 10 kg (about 22 lbs). That’s a pretty decent drop.

Low Carb?

This was neither a Low Carb nor Low Fat diet. It was a restricted calorie diet (600 calories a day). The macros were 46.4% carbohydrate, 32.5% protein and 20.1% fat; vitamins, minerals and trace elements; 2.1 MJ/day [510 kcal/day]; Optifast; Nestlé Nutrition, Croydon, UK. This was supplemented with three portions of non-starchy vegetables such that total energy intake was about 2.5 MJ (600 kcal)/day. 

It is remarkable how much fat was lost from the liver in just the first week.

Hepatic triacylglycerol content decreased by 30 ± 5% during week 1 of intervention (p < 0.001), becoming similar to control values (p = 0.75). It continued to decline throughout the intervention period to reach the normal range for non-obese individuals [20] (2.9 ± 0.2%; p = 0.003; Fig. 1), i.e. a total reduction of 70 ± 5%.

Most interestingly, the study after the study noted:

Following the intervention, participants gained 3.1±1.0 kg body weight over 12 weeks, but their HbA1c remained steady while the fat content of both pancreas and liver did not increase.

The conclusion matches my own hypothesis:

The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the abnormalities of insulin secretion and insulin resistance that underlie type 2 diabetes have a single, common aetiology, i.e. excess lipid accumulation in the liver and pancreas.

Author: Doug

I'm an Engineer who is also a science geek. I was pre-diabetic in 1996 and became a diabetic in 2003. I decided to figure out how to hack my diabetes and in 2016 found the ketogetic diet which reversed my diabetes.

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