Too Much Protein?

Here’s an interesting study on protein overfeeding (Jose Antonio, Corey A Peacock, Anya Ellerbroek, Brandon Fromhoff and Tobin Silver. The effects of consuming a high protein diet (4.4 g/kg/d) on body composition in resistance-trained individuals. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2014:11:19.).

The HP group consumed significantly more protein and calories pre vs post (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the HP group consumed significantly more protein and calories than the CON (p < 0.05). The HP group consumed on average 307 ± 69 grams of protein compared to 138 ± 42 in the CON. When expressed per unit body weight, the HP group consumed 4.4 ± 0.8 g/kg/d of protein versus 1.8 ± 0.4 g/kg/d in the CON. There were no changes in training volume for either group. Moreover, there were no significant changes over time or between groups for body weight, fat mass, fat free mass, or percent body fat.

Consuming 5.5 times the recommended daily allowance of protein has no effect on body composition in resistance-trained individuals who otherwise maintain the same training regimen. This is the first interventional study to demonstrate that consuming a hypercaloric high protein diet does not result in an increase in body fat.

Here’s the table for the data (BW= Body Weight, FFM = Fat Free Mass, FM = Fat Mass, BF = Body Fat percentage).

Body composition

Control

HP

Pre

Post

Change

Pre

Post

Change

BW (kg)

76.4 ± 9.9

77.2 ± 9.9

0.8 ± 1.6

71.8 ± 12.2

73.5 ± 12.5

1.7 ± 1.9

FFM (kg)

65.2 ± 11.7

66.5 ± 11.7

1.3 ± 2.0

59.5 ± 10.9

61.4 ± 11.6

1.9 ± 2.4

FM (kg)

11.2 ± 4.7

11.4 ± 5.0

0.3 ± 4.7

12.3 ± 7.0

12.0 ± 6.2

−0.2 ± 2.2

% BF

15.1 ± 6.9

14.2 ± 6.9

−0.9 ± 1.7

16.9 ± 8.3

16.3 ± 7.5

−0.6 ± 2.6

The High Protein group actually lose body fat and gained fat free mass in spite of overeating Protein and calories.

From the paper:

The results of the current investigation do not support the notion that consuming protein in excess of purported needs results in a gain in fat mass. Certainly, this dispels the notion that ‘a calorie is just a calorie.’ That is, protein calories in ‘excess’ of requirements are not metabolized by the body in a manner similar to carbohydrate.

 

Author: Doug

I'm an Engineer who is also a science geek. I was pre-diabetic in 1996 and became a diabetic in 2003. I decided to figure out how to hack my diabetes and in 2016 found the ketogetic diet which reversed my diabetes.

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