LDL and BHB

Ran across an older study (The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 83, Issue 5, 1 May 2006, Pages 1055–1061. Ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets have no metabolic advantage over nonketogenic low-carbohydrate diets. Carol S Johnston Sherrie L Tjonn Pamela D Swan Andrea White Heather Hutchins Barry Sears) which indicates that LDL is directly tied to BHB levels:

LDL cholesterol was directly correlated with blood β-hydroxybutyrate (r = 0.297, P = 0.025)

The study was only six weeks so it was too short a term to provide much of value in the critique of ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets. The main criticism was that people had a lack of energy on low carb during what we now know is the adaptation phase.

More details:

Compared with baseline, the 6-wk LDL concentrations increased in 5 KLC dieters (0.08, 0.13, 0.41, 0.44, and 0.52 mmol/L, respectively) and decreased in the remaining 4 KLC dieters (0.57 ± 0.18 mmol/L)

Another interesting point:

 Weight-adjusted REE increased in both diet groups over the 6-wk trial, but blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were not correlated with REE (r = −0.014, P = 0.921), which indicates that the protein content of the diet, rather than the severity of the carbohydrate restriction, likely contributed to the elevations in REE.  These data support the contention that calorie-reduced diets high in protein facilitate weight loss, in part, by preserving the metabolic rate.

 

Author: Doug

I'm an Engineer who is also a science geek. I was pre-diabetic in 1996 and became a diabetic in 2003. I decided to figure out how to hack my diabetes and in 2016 found the ketogetic diet which reversed my diabetes.

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