Move More (reprinted from Aug 2016)

Get some aerobic activity can translate into “get off your lazy behind” to some people. I am one of them. Now if I’m more than 100 lbs overweight how easy is it for me to get more exercise? Now suppose I’m eating all three recommended meals and suffering the insulin rise that comes with those meals.

I propose this idea for those who tell me to get more exercise. They need to strap a 120 lb weight on their back and hop on the stair machine or the elliptical. Because that’s what it is like when I get on one of those machines. My pulse rate goes up when I get up to walk to the bathroom. My guess is that my muscle mass is as much as most skinny people. How many of them can walk a mile with a 120 lb weight strapped to them?

I’ve only been on this Intermittent Fasting “diet” for about 10 days but I have a lot more energy. I can’t stay in bed long and I am awake late. I actually cleaned up my kitchen for the first time in 2 years. I cleaned out my living room and hauled a bunch of old bottles to the recycling center today (I am on a week stay-cation with the kids). Most of my house looks like I am no longer a hoarder (a joke not intended to insult those with the real condition).

When I lost 70 lbs back in 1997 I was able to do a lot of physical activity. I rode my bike and roller bladed around the neighborhood (my age at the time was upper 30’s). I long for the day when my body isn’t so pulled down by gravity that I moan to get up.

Benefits of Exercise

It is known that exercise lowers insulin resistance (Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1986;711:55-65. Effects of Exercise on Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance . Brief review and some preliminary results Effects of exercise on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Holloszy JO, Schultz J, Kusnierkiewicz J, Hagberg JM, Ehsani AA.). From that page.

Preliminary results are presented in this paper showing that prolonged, strenuous and frequent exercise can also completely normalize GT by decreasing resistance to insulin in some patients with mild non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in some individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT).

What constitutes prolonged, strenuous and frequent exercise? The abstract continues:

The amount of exercise required to normalize GT in such patients appears to be in the range of 25 to 35 km per week of running, or a comparable amount of another form of exercise, performed on a regular basis.

That is 15-21 miles a week. I wonder how many years it would take to work up to that level if exercise? At 4 days a week, that’s running 4-5 miles a day. I am sure there are people who can and do that but really? The level of exercise it would take for a non-mild T2D to reverse their condition is pretty extreme. How many people are able to keep that up over their lifetime without some injury which stops the running?

Add to that their statement:

Exercise appears to be effective in normalizing GT only in patients who still have an adequate capacity to secrete insulin, and in whom insulin resistance is the major cause for abnormal GT.

I wonder how much my pancreas still can make? I guess I will find out as I lower my external Insulin.

Author: Doug

I'm an Engineer who is also a science geek. I was pre-diabetic in 1996 and became a diabetic in 2003. I decided to figure out how to hack my diabetes and in 2016 found the ketogetic diet which reversed my diabetes.

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