Volek Talks about the FASTER Study

A video from 2015 where Dr. Volek talks about the FASTER Study (Jeff S. Volek, Daniel J. Freidenreich, Catherine Saenz, Laura J. Kunces, Brent C. Creighton, Jenna M. Bartley, Patrick M. Davitt, Colleen X. Munoz, Jeffrey M. Anderson, Carl M. Maresh, Elaine C. Lee, Mark D. Schuenke, Giselle Aerni, William J. Kraemer, Stephen D. Phinney. Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners. Metabolism, Volume 65, Issue 3, March 2016, Pages 100-110.).

  1. Fat adapted athletes become “bonk proof” (see my post about that).
  2. Group of ultra-runners.
  3. More athletes volunteered than could be tested.
  4. Matched groups.
  5. LCD group was 70-20-10 F-P-C.
  6. HCD group was 25-15-60 P-F-C.
  7. Day 2 was three hours at 65% of VO2max (see my post about that). He later stated it ended up being at 64% of VO2max.
  8. They thought peak fat oxidation would be lower due to other studies documenting lower rates. They could have told from any low carb VO2max test that the peak rates were higher in Low Carb dieters.
  9. It looks as if they picked the 65% number based on this study (Achten J1, Gleeson M, Jeukendrup AE. Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Jan;34(1):92-7.).
  10. Volek showed the same graph from the VESPA article with the shift up and to the right of the fat oxidation curve (see my post about that).
  11. The statistically identical glycogen levels before, after and at the end of recovery were a surprise to Volek (as they are to me). Does fat allow the glycogen stores to refill? He thinks there is a chronic adaptation in LC athletes. It isn’t likely to be peripheral insulin resistance since the athlete’s muscles were biopsied to measure the glycogen levels, right? Alaskan sled dogs may provide a clue?
  12. Athletes were on LC for an average of 19 months.
  13. Gene expression differences between the two groups still being analyzed. Glycogen metabolism gene differences.
  14. LDL Cholesterol levels were much higher in LC athletes. HDL was also much higher in LC athletes.
  15. LDL Particle distributions were better in LC athletes (fewer smaller and more large LDL).
  16. Insulin Resistance scores were much better in LC athletes (top 1% of population).
  17. Half the high carb athletes have switched to low carb diet after the study.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.