MAF and Resistance Training

I’ve spent a little bit of time thinking about the compatibility of MAF Heart Rate Training and weightlifting – generically termed resistance training (RT). Since the activity is relatively short duration and the heart rate isn’t past the MAF Heart Rate it seems on the surface like it would be compatible to do both.

One thing to consider is that VO2max testing is done on a treadmill which increases the speed and angle every couple of minutes. Resistance training lasts for seconds. The Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) of the VO2max testing isn’t all that hard until it gets towards the end of the test. The RPE of weightlifting is substantial under significant loads so using RPE as a test this would indicate that there is an issue.

My measurement for whether an activity is aerobic or anaerobic is the Respiratory Exchange Ratio (RER). RER is correlated to heart rate in the VO2max test but rarely considered in RT. There is a study which looked at RER in RT (Scott. Quantifying the Immediate Recovery Energy Expenditure of Resistance Training. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research · April 2011) in terms of Excess Postexercise Oxygen Consumption (EPOC). To review:

The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) is calculated as steady-state CO2 produced divided by steady-state O2 consumed and is typically defined from values of 0.70 representing total fat oxidation to 1.00 representing total glucose oxidation.

Here’s the RER data from the study for RT. Note the RER values are all well over 1.0 which indicates anaerobic exercise range.

Another interesting comment helps explain the RER values above 1.0:

During and after exercise, RER values above 1.00 are generally thought to be the result of nonrespiratory CO2 production: The bicarbonate buffering system, for example, involves the removal of hydrogen ions with concomitant CO2 production and hyperventilation blows off ‘‘extra’’ CO2. Yet a true measure of the RER is best found only when the system is in a steady state of gas exchange.

To the subject at hand:

Rapid glycolysis (as part of anaerobic metabolism) ceases when muscle contraction stops so that recovery is considered to be aerobic in nature. If this is true, both fatty acid and lactate oxidation may play a significant role in fueling the immediate energy expenditure needs of recovery. Unfortunately, substrate oxidation immediately postexercise and particularly after anaerobic-type exercise has not been studied well enough to draw specific conclusions. Because of this, it must be assumed here that when muscle contraction immediately stops, glycolysis is limited to the point where fat and lactate are the predominantly oxidized fuels.

 

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