Exercise and Stress

There are plenty of sources of stress in our lives. Exercise both helps with stress and causes stress. Here’s a good survey of the subject (Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Nov 1; 1(6): 783–792.  Stress and the neuroendocrine system: the role of exercise as a stressor and modifier of stress. Anthony C Hackney, PhD, CPH).

From the summary:

  • Physical exercise is a stressor to the human body and serves as a robust activator of the neuroendocrine system, provided that the exercise is of sufficient volume (i.e., intensity and/or duration). The magnitude of the neuroendocrine stress response to exercise seems directly proportional to the volume of exercise exposure. These stress hormone responses are typically very transient in nature and do not last longer than a few minutes to hours into recovery.
  • Chronic exposure to exercise training results in adaptations in the neuroendocrine system, such that there is a reduction in hormonal stress response to submaximal exercise and, in many cases, reduced circulating basal stress hormone levels. This abatement of the hormonal stress response with exercise training has implications for dealing with many chronic stress-related health problems.
  • The adaptability and plasticity in the neuroendocrine system to exercise training has limits. Excessive exercise training can push the neuroendocrine exercise stress response to become inappropriate, resulting in the potential development of chronic fatigue and the overtraining syndrome condition.

 

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